Anyone who puts their hands in the soil and grows something knows how good it can be for the soul.

The City of Melbourne recently brought us in on a great project, installing a closed-loop food garden at the Salvation Army headquarters in the CBD.

The Salvo's run Hamodava Cafe in the building, a community centre providing over 400 meals a day for their clients, with most of the ingredients being delivered daily by Second Bite.  It is an incredible resource - not just for great food and coffee but also access to advice, support and services. And of course human connection and community.

Wormlovers installed six worm farms in the building - three near the main kitchen and three outside the cafe - so they can start to process food waste on site.  We also installed the first two wicking beds in the courtyard which will be used to grow vegetables and herbs for the kitchens.  The worm farms feed the garden beds feed the people feed the worm farms - the closed loop.

Everyone is excited about the possibilities, and we are working with Major Brendan Nottle and Jill Post from City of Melbourne to look how we can build on this great start.

The Lord Mayor Robert Doyle dropped in for a visit and could immediately see the value of the system, and the opportunities for other areas of the city!

There is discussion of more worm farms, more garden boxes and hopes that a rooftop garden will be feasible, all great ways to re-engage people with growing food, managing worms and producing food.

Either way we have loved being involved and we can't wait to see where it leads.

Posted in community, council, food gardens.